Mind Output

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Posts tagged john green

2,960 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

A few days ago, I received an email from P. F. Kluge, my fiction writing professor from Kenyon College, saying, “Drop everything and read How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.” 
So I did, and what a book. Brilliant and ruthless. Don’t miss it.

If John Green, celebrated author and Youtuberarian, tells you to read something you’d chose wisely to actually drop everything and read the thing.

fishingboatproceeds:

A few days ago, I received an email from P. F. Kluge, my fiction writing professor from Kenyon College, saying, “Drop everything and read How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.” 

So I did, and what a book. Brilliant and ruthless. Don’t miss it.

If John Green, celebrated author and Youtuberarian, tells you to read something you’d chose wisely to actually drop everything and read the thing.

Filed under moshin hamid how to get filthy rich in rising asia john green professor's choice

70,119 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

I know most tumblypoos aren’t old enough to remember with me, but when I was in high school, this was unimaginable. I mean that literally: I could not imagine it.

The President of the United States did not say the word AIDS in public until 1987, by which time more than 20,000 Americans had died. The chronic under-funding of AIDS research was driven primarily by systemic homophobia. The President himself privately remarked, “Maybe the Lord brought down this plague [because] illicit sex is against the ten commandments.” 

References to homosexuality as a mental illness were not completely removed from the American Psychiatric Society’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Gay sex was a crime in most American states until 1989 (and in many until 2003).

Seventeen years ago, the year I graduated from high school, a classmate posted an anonymous open letter in my school’s paper saying that s/he was gay and found the homophobic language used by his/her classmates offensive. This is embarrassing to admit, but it had never occurred to me that constant use of the word “gay” in pejorative contexts would be offensive to someone I knew, because it never occurred to me that I knew any gay people.

And then for more than a decade, a long string of state constitutional amendments excluded LGBT people from legal marriage and the rights associated with it. It must have been very hurtful, to have voters in state after state after state decide to exclude you from the full rights and protections of citizenship in this country.

Well, change is coming. In 1986, the President thought AIDS was a scourge given to sinners. In 1995, I learned not to use the word “gay” as a pejorative adjective. And on Tuesday, a majority of voters in four very different states in very different parts of the country said NO to the hate, fear, bigotry, and exclusion that have shaped our policy on marital rights in this country.

I know that it’s still hard, that many LGBT people are threatened and bullied and dehumanized by their peers and denied rights by their governments. We have a long way to go. But the young anonymous gay person who wrote that open letter to my high school in 1995? She just oversaw a campaigns to bring marriage equality in Maine. 

And she’s married.

That plot twist at the end is beautiful. *single tear of joy*

(Source: dorothy-snarker)

Filed under john green gay marriage gay rights maine maryland minnesota washington reblog fairness

21,640 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

Everybody was told to make a funny face, but I didn’t get the memo.
Esther Earl would’ve been 18 tomorrow, a real adult. I miss her. 
It’s very easy to turn the dead into Lessons for the Living—to say that Esther taught me to Live Life or To Be Grateful or Not To Take Beauty for Granted. But honestly, in my opinion at least, any lessons learned from her death could’ve been learned in some other, easier way. I think the universe overall would be better off if she were still making videos.
I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died. 
She was young, blessed with a genuinely sophomoric sense of humor, silly, empathetic, madly in love with her friends and family, and a very gifted writer. It’s hard to isolate why, but I’ve never liked a teenager so much—at least not since I was a teenager. She was just really cool, in the best sense of the word. She never made me feel uncomfortable. She listened to me and responded thoughtfully, and was also happy to tell me I was full of shit. 
(On the day this picture was taken, I generally did a not-great job of being an Adult and cried a lot, and at one point Esther was talking about her complicated relationship with the idea of heaven, and I answered that there were all kinds of ways of imagining an infinite afterlife, some of which weren’t even necessarily that supernatural, and she just cocked me a look like, “You need to learn the meaning of the word infinite.” She was right, of course. Back in my hotel room that night, I jotted down easy comfort isn’t comforting, which ended up in TFiOS.) 
The nearly two years since her death have complicated my relationship with Esther because now of course there is not only time but a book between us: I could never have written The Fault in Our Stars without knowing Esther. Every word on that book depends upon her.
But at the same time, I don’t want people conflating Esther with Hazel (they’re very different), and it’s extremely important to me that I not claim to be telling Esther’s story. Esther’s story belongs to Esther and to her family, and they will tell it brilliantly and beautifully.
When I was doing publicity for the book, lots of reporters wanted me to talk about Esther because these days novels “based on a true story” do so much better than novels that are just novels. I never really knew how to deal with these questions, and I still don’t, because the truth (as always) is complicated: Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish. But the story is also inspired by many other people—by my son, by my wife, by the kids I knew and loved who died in the children’s hospital when I was a student chaplain, by my own parents (my dad is a cancer survivor), etc.
I wish she’d read TFiOS. I suspect she would’ve found it a bit far-fetched, but I do hope she’d have enjoyed it anyway. I’ll never know, though. I am astonished that the book has found such a broad audience, but the person I most want to read it never will.
Esther has become a hero in our community, and the heroic narrative doesn’t always line up perfectly with the person she was. (Heroic narratives never do.) But this much was true, at least as far as I knew her: She was generous, and loving, and full of grace—which was, after all, her middle name.
Plus, she knew how to make a funny face on cue.
When I told Esther we wanted to celebrate her birthday as long as there were vlogbrothers videos, and that videos on that day could be about whatever she wanted them to be about, she waited a couple weeks before getting back to me. She finally decided she wanted it to be a day that celebrated love in families and among friends. I think of Esther Day as a kind of Valentine’s Day for all the other kinds of love.
It was a brilliant idea, Esther. Thank you for Esther Day. Thank you for helping me say to my family and friends what I still hope I can say to you, even over the great divide: I love you.
(You can support This Star Won’t Go Out, the organization founded in Esther’s memory that helps families of children with cancer, directly here or by buying a TSWGO wristband.)

fishingboatproceeds:

Everybody was told to make a funny face, but I didn’t get the memo.

Esther Earl would’ve been 18 tomorrow, a real adult. I miss her. 

It’s very easy to turn the dead into Lessons for the Living—to say that Esther taught me to Live Life or To Be Grateful or Not To Take Beauty for Granted. But honestly, in my opinion at least, any lessons learned from her death could’ve been learned in some other, easier way. I think the universe overall would be better off if she were still making videos.

I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died. 

She was young, blessed with a genuinely sophomoric sense of humor, silly, empathetic, madly in love with her friends and family, and a very gifted writer. It’s hard to isolate why, but I’ve never liked a teenager so much—at least not since I was a teenager. She was just really cool, in the best sense of the word. She never made me feel uncomfortable. She listened to me and responded thoughtfully, and was also happy to tell me I was full of shit. 

(On the day this picture was taken, I generally did a not-great job of being an Adult and cried a lot, and at one point Esther was talking about her complicated relationship with the idea of heaven, and I answered that there were all kinds of ways of imagining an infinite afterlife, some of which weren’t even necessarily that supernatural, and she just cocked me a look like, “You need to learn the meaning of the word infinite.” She was right, of course. Back in my hotel room that night, I jotted down easy comfort isn’t comforting, which ended up in TFiOS.) 

The nearly two years since her death have complicated my relationship with Esther because now of course there is not only time but a book between us: I could never have written The Fault in Our Stars without knowing Esther. Every word on that book depends upon her.

But at the same time, I don’t want people conflating Esther with Hazel (they’re very different), and it’s extremely important to me that I not claim to be telling Esther’s story. Esther’s story belongs to Esther and to her family, and they will tell it brilliantly and beautifully.

When I was doing publicity for the book, lots of reporters wanted me to talk about Esther because these days novels “based on a true story” do so much better than novels that are just novels. I never really knew how to deal with these questions, and I still don’t, because the truth (as always) is complicated: Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish. But the story is also inspired by many other people—by my son, by my wife, by the kids I knew and loved who died in the children’s hospital when I was a student chaplain, by my own parents (my dad is a cancer survivor), etc.

I wish she’d read TFiOS. I suspect she would’ve found it a bit far-fetched, but I do hope she’d have enjoyed it anyway. I’ll never know, though. I am astonished that the book has found such a broad audience, but the person I most want to read it never will.

Esther has become a hero in our community, and the heroic narrative doesn’t always line up perfectly with the person she was. (Heroic narratives never do.) But this much was true, at least as far as I knew her: She was generous, and loving, and full of grace—which was, after all, her middle name.

Plus, she knew how to make a funny face on cue.

When I told Esther we wanted to celebrate her birthday as long as there were vlogbrothers videos, and that videos on that day could be about whatever she wanted them to be about, she waited a couple weeks before getting back to me. She finally decided she wanted it to be a day that celebrated love in families and among friends. I think of Esther Day as a kind of Valentine’s Day for all the other kinds of love.

It was a brilliant idea, Esther. Thank you for Esther Day. Thank you for helping me say to my family and friends what I still hope I can say to you, even over the great divide: I love you.

(You can support This Star Won’t Go Out, the organization founded in Esther’s memory that helps families of children with cancer, directly here or by buying a TSWGO wristband.)

Filed under john green reblog esther esther day family friends i love you cancer the cruelty of existance easy comfort easy comfort isn't comforting

1,455 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

heartwolf:

I really love the German cover of The Fault in Our Stars.

I am very fond of it, too. It makes me happy to see the Indianapolis skyline on the cover of a German novel.

So they took The Fault in Our Stars and translated it to something and now, when I translate it back, it says Fate is a Wretched Traitor.
Interesting. For that little factotum alone I need to buy a copy :D
But I think it’s weird because I can think of other German translations that would have captured the Caesar reference better.

fishingboatproceeds:

heartwolf:

I really love the German cover of The Fault in Our Stars.

I am very fond of it, too. It makes me happy to see the Indianapolis skyline on the cover of a German novel.

So they took The Fault in Our Stars and translated it to something and now, when I translate it back, it says Fate is a Wretched Traitor.

Interesting. For that little factotum alone I need to buy a copy :D

But I think it’s weird because I can think of other German translations that would have captured the Caesar reference better.

(Source: heartwolf-archive)

Filed under reblog the fault in our stars john green translation das schicksal ist ein mieser verräter

361,099 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

prestonhymas:



INNOVATIVE DOORKNOB
Even doorknobs can be improved upon. If a door is locked it should not be available to even try and open.

This shit is dope.

Even better, the door should be replaced by a wall so that no one even knows the room exists.

#1 priority in my dream home: multiple hidden rooms, including/especially a library.

What John Green said. Obviously.
In other news: When I was handing out copies of The Fault of the Stars to family, friends and surprised customers at my video store one of them called me her “Secret Librarian” - a term I’ve been obessing about ever since.
It seems only the next logical step to aquire a secret library.
Nerdfighters HU-HA !!!

fishingboatproceeds:

prestonhymas:

INNOVATIVE DOORKNOB

Even doorknobs can be improved upon. If a door is locked it should not be available to even try and open.

This shit is dope.

Even better, the door should be replaced by a wall so that no one even knows the room exists.

#1 priority in my dream home: multiple hidden rooms, including/especially a library.

What John Green said. Obviously.

In other news: When I was handing out copies of The Fault of the Stars to family, friends and surprised customers at my video store one of them called me her “Secret Librarian” - a term I’ve been obessing about ever since.

It seems only the next logical step to aquire a secret library.

Nerdfighters HU-HA !!!

(Source: shutthefuckupbro)

Filed under hidden doors awesome doorknob secret library secret librarian john green reblog

596 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

The traditional study of world history tells us that history is made primarily by people wearing funny hats. In today’s episode of Crash Course, I argue that history is actually made by people like us.

Thanks for watching and sharing Crash Course. I hate encouraging people to share stuff they like—I mean, obviously if you like something you will share it—but…yeah. If you like Crash Course, and you want it to continue to be a thing, sharing is the most efficient way to make that happen.

Crash Course World History is informative, entertaining, funny and my main source of common knowledge on historical topics.

I can wholeheartedly endorse it.

Filed under john green reblog crash course world history endorsement

1,405 notes

Hank Green's Tumblr: On Ad Block

fishingboatproceeds:


edwardspoonhands
:

On my most recent video I saw a whole ton of comments from people saying “I never see pre-rolls on Vlogbrothers videos because I have AD BLOCK installed.” Well, two problems here.

  1. No one sees pre-rolls on vlogbrothers videos because we don’t run them
  2. I am not sure how I feel about Ad Blockers and I wish you would consider your decision more carefully, especially your apparent desire to share the world. 

    If everyone was like you and used ad blockers, there would be no Freddie Wong videos to watch. There would be no YouTube. There would be no Google or GMail or Facebook or any of it. If everyone used ad block, the internet would be made of things that suck and things that cost money.

    And so when you say to the world “HEY PONCES! WTF AREN’T YOU USING AD BLOCK! SUCKERS!” What you’re saying is “Let’s all work together to destroy the internet.”

    The only reason Ad Block works for you is that most people don’t use it. It is in your best interest to keep Ad Block quiet and not let anyone know about it. Spend like 13 seconds thinking through a world where Ad Block gets installed on a substantial number of browsers in the world:

    Advertisers call up platforms (Google, YouTube, Facebook, etc) and say “We aren’t going to pay you for advertisements if no one sees them.”

    The platforms freak out and spend a huge amount of time and money creating Ad Block Blockers. Maybe they partner with Mozilla. Maybe with the US Government. Maybe they create another technological solution. In any case, afterward the internet is clunkier and maybe even less free than beforehand.

    Ad Blockers counter by working around the work-arounds. 

    Advertisers still pull back funds, the internet gets worse. Less money is spent on making the internet cool and interesting, more money is spend on trying to defeat Ad Blockers. 

    At the end of the day, your attempts to remove some pixels that were off in the corner of the screen where you probably would never have seen them anyway have made the whole world a less awesome place. 

    I understand the desire to work-around a system that annoys you. But I do not understand the apparent inability of some people to think their decisions through to their logical conclusion.

    ***FOOTNOTE ON TUMBLR***

    You may notice that Tumblr neither costs money nor sucks. However, before Tumblr got it’s most recent round of venture capital funding, you may also remember how it was crashing 20 or 30 times per day. The funding that made it possible for Tumblr to stay online consistently would not have come in if the people with that money did not believe that someday Tumblr would have some kind of path to profitability…and the clearest of those paths is through advertising.

I’m reblogging this again because 90% of the comments in my new video seem to brag about AdBlock as if it’s some easy solution to the complicated role that corporations play in facilitating and problematizing the relationship between people who make stuff on the Internet and people who enjoy that stuff.

In fact, AdBlock does no such thing. It mostly only hurts the creators of the stuff you like, because it doesn’t prevent YouTube from collecting valuable information about you that they then use to grow and improve their company. If everyone—or even 20% of people—used AdBlock, we could not afford to ignore our other jobs to make regular vlogbrothers videos, let alone create expensive educational content like crashcourse.

I don’t know what the solution to this complicated problem is, but it sure as hell isn’t AdBlock.

Please note that this does not say “do not use ad block” - it simply says “be smart about it”. That is the nice way of saying “shut the hell up if you are using it”.

I use ad block. But I also browse a lot of unsafe sites that want to spam me with constant pop-ups and layer adds over adds. I am dumb enough to click on links that lead to sites that are basically advertisement traps.

On sites like youtube or HomerJ.de I have disengaged ad block. Why? Because I like the content I am getting there. I comprehend that especially small channels are fragile and depend hugely on advertisement revenue.

So please: Don’t pass around ad block as some sort of good advice. It’s not. Use it were you need to - and disable it if you like something.

Support the awesome - quell the suck!

(Source: )

Filed under ad block reblog john green hang green internet advertisement finance use wisely